I'm Onyx, 26 and from southern England. This is my personal blog and mostly made up of random text posts and my own photos and drawings.
Interests include animals, wildlife watching, taxidermy and vulture culture, drawing and photography.

My other blogs;
The Last Jackals Comic
The Urban Fox Watcher
How To Skin A Tiger
The Canid Compendium
The Golden Jackal Blog
Europe Wilds

My Etsy Shop: TheFoxBrush

2nd June 2013

Photo with 226 notes

Here’s a fascinating photo I’ve never seen before from the book I brought today.
It’s captioned as a mounted specimen, but there’s no way it’s a piece of taxidermy. It’s too flawless for even a modern piece, let alone a historical mount. The anatomy and head shape are perfect (I’ve never seen a single mounted thylacine with the correct head), ears are perfect, nose is still plump and shiny etc. Also notice it’s eyes are closed, (why would you mount it with closed eyes?)
Also look carefully at the neck. There appears to be a completely bald patch all the way around with possible cuts, suggesting the animal had been caught in a snare or similar device. This can only be either a live animal, or, as I suspect, a recently killed one.
I believe this is an animal killed in a snare, either deliberately or by accident, and posed to look stuffed. It also looks like the photo could have been taken much later then the extinction date of the thylacine. Unfortunately as there’s no more data with the photograph it’s impossible to say when or where it was taken, but if it was post-1936 it’s absolute proof that thylacines did continue to exist past that date!
I shall have to do some digging and see if I can find any more info on this photo.

Here’s a fascinating photo I’ve never seen before from the book I brought today.

It’s captioned as a mounted specimen, but there’s no way it’s a piece of taxidermy. It’s too flawless for even a modern piece, let alone a historical mount. The anatomy and head shape are perfect (I’ve never seen a single mounted thylacine with the correct head), ears are perfect, nose is still plump and shiny etc. Also notice it’s eyes are closed, (why would you mount it with closed eyes?)

Also look carefully at the neck. There appears to be a completely bald patch all the way around with possible cuts, suggesting the animal had been caught in a snare or similar device. This can only be either a live animal, or, as I suspect, a recently killed one.

I believe this is an animal killed in a snare, either deliberately or by accident, and posed to look stuffed. It also looks like the photo could have been taken much later then the extinction date of the thylacine. Unfortunately as there’s no more data with the photograph it’s impossible to say when or where it was taken, but if it was post-1936 it’s absolute proof that thylacines did continue to exist past that date!

I shall have to do some digging and see if I can find any more info on this photo.

Tagged: thylacinetasmanian tigercrytozoologycryptid

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